‘Liberation’ in daily life

On this 26th day of January 2022, the NRM Liberation Day remembrance, my thoughts are dominated by what liberation actually means to us in our day to day lives in Uganda. I am especially concerned by the way in which we “modernise” or more accurately “global-westernise” by losing a lot of our good food and nutrition practices.

Case in point, grinding cereals with grinding stones at home is healthier than grinding them with those metallic gadgets. And yet, it is considered modern these days to use commercial grinding machines for nearly all cereals. I particularly have doubts of those commercial machines that hare used to grind groundnuts.

Am in Lorukul Village in Karenga in Karamoja in the matriarch’s big house grinding sorghum.

For me, liberation means restoration and preservation of the good food and nutrition practices of our ancestors. Liberation, to me, means that within Uganda we promote inter-cultural exchange and learning among the 50+ first nations of Uganda. Domestic tourism is one way in which we can do so.

Uganda is truly a gifted country and a lot of the fantastic image of our country we hardly see in the media. Give yourselves a taste of liberation. Save up and invest in self-education your domestic tourism.

Featured photo: at Lorokul Village in Karenga in Karamoja drying and preserving cereals by hanging them in the kitchen house.

1 thought on “‘Liberation’ in daily life”

  1. I once thought to myself, what will happen of us when our parents and grandparents pass on, has anyone documented their knowledge on certain things pertaining society and culture? being a born of teso, herbs as medication were a thing then but is that information anywhere for us who shall be left behind? Do we know of those trees that we should treasure for medicinal purposes? Food security was the thing back in the day with the famous phrase ‘anyami engo orekon’ that was commonly used by the Iteso’ not because the person was Bragging but because he knew behind him was enough food to take him through a given period of time and he trusted on the strength of his hands to till the land.
    It’s upon such thoughts that I thought to myself, I hope one day I can interact with many elders and document this things, I hope someday I can start an initiative to bring back food security to teso encouraging every community to set up ‘edula’ in their homesteads to always set aside something for times ahead.
    I hope we can sit back and pick a leaf from our forefathers on their ways of life.

    Liked by 1 person

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