Ugandan Farmers Are Not Peasants

The implications of an industrialised economy with a developed service sector, as it is espoused in that vision, implies that smallholder farmers and semi-nomadic pastoralists who live in rural areas of Uganda, necessarily have to cede ownership of their land to others better positioned to use it in “optimal” ways. Those currently mal-described as “peasants” are required to transform into landless labourers and service providers and to be like the majority of the British, who are landless labourers.

Detoxify our Discourse of Cultural Imperialism

It is a good start, but the voice needs to get stronger for detoxification of discourse in key fora and documents of formerly colonized nations. For example, the discourse in such documents as Uganda's national planning instruments - narrative plans and budgets. It does us no good to rename physical assets, while we accept descriptions of us, which falsely denigrate us, to be included in and to form the basis of our nation's official national plans and budgets.

Uganda’s Official Language is English (ePDF)

The Constitution of the Republic of Uganda recognises 55 first nations of Uganda, which it refers to as "tribes"; and each of these 55 first nations have a language. However, none of our languages is recognised as an official language of our country, Ugandan. English, the language of those who colonised the territory now known… Continue reading Uganda’s Official Language is English (ePDF)

Uganda’s Exogenous Knowledge

During the colonial period, knowledge systems of the English, who colonised the territory now known as Uganda, were overtly enforced in the territory. The older generations of the descendants of ‘African-Ugandans’, for example, will recall how severely they were forced to learn English at school and to abandon speaking their own ‘African-Ugandan’ languages. Evidence of… Continue reading Uganda’s Exogenous Knowledge

Uganda’s Endogenous Knowledge

‘Khosian-Ugandan’ and ‘African-Ugandan’ cultures are the endogenous knowledge of Uganda. This discussion, however, does not pretend expertise in the original culture of ‘Khosian-Ugandans’ nor of ‘African-Ugandans’. The emphasis of this discussion, is to simply insist that they existed. That they existed, is evidenced, for example, by the fact that they were referenced in speeches during… Continue reading Uganda’s Endogenous Knowledge